Thursday, September 29, 2005

choclo time

Picked some nice seed choclos, one a very intence purple that looks to have some wrinklers- will be saving them for next year's purple sweet. Picked 2 other nice ladies and hung them in the entryway to dry. May rain friday. Fall is in the air. 3 turkeys showed up today- acted as if I should feed them. Tom and two ladies. Mostly black-looked to be a more wild strain. Think they have been getting in my garden- scratching up holes and new seedlings. My garden has been subjected to much critter visitation this season- its been a wonder that there has been plenty for me. Been thinking of eating some of the venison I fed- maybe turkey too. Thankfull that no critters have taken a liking to corn yet. It's well wrapped and a bit hard to get at without hands.

4 comments:

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choclosteve said...

Well , this is entising. What shall i say? Well, i've just been thinking about eating what comes around- it's probably better for me than that bread for high fat stuff they sell in the strore. But... I have been eating some bufalo from the store lately; seems more lean than beef. Hear conflicting things about the high fat store stuff vs the more natural wild stuff. Interesting factoid, canibals say our flesh is delicious- very high fat contact. Polinisians called our meat "long pig". The Ache liked to eat their relatives and friends in order to keep some part of them with them. I guess that since they tasted good, there would be good memories of ingesting some of them into one's self. I do not think they killeed them because they were hungry, and often they died accidently. Personally, I don't like eating old animals-although who knows what you get in the store. I am glad to hear that the infant mortality rate is going down for the Ache and that they are no longer eating human flesh. Hate to envision barbequeing a scrawny 95 year old. The Ache are strugling with their addoption to the modern world. I do think their life is easier now. I have had a continuing interest in indiginous peoples' adoptions to the modern world. Panama has some contrasts. The Cuna do well- but their inbreeding seems to produce a large number of albinoes. I'm a fan of hibreds- my grandson seems to be showing signs of hi-bred vigor already- but the observers are prejudiced- we'll see. Sure am enjoying my hi-bred corn- very sweet.

choclosteve said...

So- I'm off writing about indigiounous cultures. Sure like the Moskitoes in the Carabian border area of Nicaragua and Honduras. They are not at all inbred and their nieghbors the Garafuna are not either-both have a lot of black blood mixed in- they had a different approach to the forign intruders than some of their nieghbors . The Moskitos sold or traded turtle meat to the European visitors and one of them was on board Magellan's ship when it rounded South America. They make these big dugout sailing canoes that they sail out to off shore cayes where they hunt sea turtles- big ones, 200, 300 and more lbs. Their favorate is the green turtle. Other Moskito villages are along streams and lagoons, where they eat more fish and land based critters. At one lagoon, Julia and I ate a lot of conch soup-yumm. They say that Oliver North hung out at a certain bar in Trujillo, the closest Honduranian town to the Honduranian Moskito area. One pretty much has to fly into most of the Nicaraguan Coast and the portion of the Honduranian coast from Trujillo to the border. Puerto Cabezas, Nicaragua is the main port town near the border and does not have good all weather road connections with the rest of the country. The only good surface transpertation to the Nicaraguan Atantic Coast is to catch the ferry boat at Rama down the river to Blue Fields, the port the US mined during the Contra war. So before the Sandinista revolt, our buddy Samoza let US use remote Puerto Cabeza as a staging port for our Bay of Pigs invasion of Cuba. An interesting and wild town. During the Contra War there was a lot of US military and CIA and Contra and Sandinista activity in this area. A lot of stories there